Fukagawa Area — Around Morishita Station

Fukagawa Area — Around Morishita Station

Area of Toei Oedo Line, Toei Shinjuku Line "Morishita Station" neighborhood. In land where development originated in Fukagawa Area from the earliest time, it is famous for Fukagawa Shinmeigu Shrine as The birthplace of Fukagawa. It is said that there was Basho hermitage where Matsuo Basho lived in in Mannenbashi Bridge neighborhood appearing to many ukiyoe prints, and walk to rotate in conjunction with the ground related to Basho which, besides, scatters in ward is recommended.

List of sightseeing theme spots

1. Fukagawa Shinmeigu Shrine (fukagawashimmeiguu)

Fukagawa Shinmeigu Shrine

Hachiroemon Fukagawa and his dependents came from Settsu province (now part of Osaka Prefecture) during the Keicho era (1596–1615), and undertook to develop land around here for rice cultivation. This newly developed locale was consequently named Fukagawa Village after Hachiroemon’s surname, thereby giving rise to the Fukagawa area name that is still in use today. It is unclear when Fukagawa Shinmeigu Shrine was established, but it is said that Hachiroemon Fukagawa deified three written poems—originally written by Emperor Go-Tsuchimikado and called ‘Daijinguu’—in a small shrine which had existed since before his arrival. This is how the god of that small shrine came to protect the village. Deified in a corner of the shrine grounds is Jurou, who is one of the Fukagawa Shichifukujin (Fukagawa Seven Gods of Good Fortune) and said to bestow longevity.

See details

2. Chokeiji Temple (chokeiji)

Chokeiji Temple

Within the temple grounds are the remains of the Basho Ouku burial mound, which was also known variously as the Hokku, Shigure, and Tanjaku burial mound. The Kuzuka was lost due to war damage, and all that now remains is a stone pedestal.

See details

3. Takumi-no-yakata (rumen and person cooking)

Takumi-no-yakata

Much Traditional Art is left in Koto City. Koto City supported consumer life of capital from the Edo era, and this has been formed in history that developed. Artworks by craftspeople who have been recognized by the City as the holders of registered intangible cultural assets (arts and crafts) are specially selected for exhibition at Kosho Ichibankan, while the world of artisans is on display at Kosho Nibankan, in the form of specially selected exhibits relating to the history, techniques, and tools which have supported traditional arts and crafts.

See details

4. Ito Shinsui and Sekine Shoji Exhibition Corner (itoushinsui, sekineshojishokaitenjikona)

Ito Shinsui and Sekine Shoji Exhibition Corner

Itou Shinsui was born in Nishi Morishita-cho in Fukagawa, and as an exemplar of the expression of feminine beauty in Japanese Ukiyo-e artworks, established his own worldview of beauty. Sekine Shoji was born at around the same time in Shirakawa, Fukushima Prefecture. Through meeting Shinsui he began painting works that overflow with individuality, and was representative of western-style painters in the Taisho era. The exhibit describes the lives and works of these two artists, whose art and lifestyles were so contrasting.

See details

5. Tagawa Suiho Norakuro-kan(Norakuro building) (tagawasuiho, norakurokan)

Tagawa Suiho Norakuro-kan(Norakuro building)

Tagawa Suiho (whose real name was Takamizawa Nakatarou) was the creator of ‘Norakuro’, and a manga artist with a strong connection to Koto City, where he lived from early childhood through to adolescence. In 1998 (the 10th year of the Heisei era), items from Tagawa’s estate, including artworks and the desk from his study, were donated to Koto City by his surviving family members. This provided the opportunity to establish the Tagawa Suiho Norakuro Museum, in order to introduce visitors to Tagawa’s achievements, which left a significant mark on the world of Japanese manga.

See details

6. Shin-ohashi Bridge (shinohashi)

Shin-ohashi Bridge

The name of Shin-ohashi Bridge comes from that it is bridge built over (1693) newly downstream in 1693 of Ryogokubashi called "Ohashi". The current bridge (completed in 1977, the 52nd year of the Showa era), whose geometrical design capitalizes on the use of straight lines, is both modern and very beautiful. Together with Kiyosubashi Bridge, it has been selected as one of the Hundred Views of Modern Tokyo.

See details

7. Shin-ohashi Bridge name board (shinohashikyomeiban)

Shin-ohashi Bridge name board

When Shin-ohashi Bridge was rebuilt to steel bridge in (1912) in 1912, bridge name board was raised on the Koto City side. After that, in 1973 (the 48th year of the Showa era) the decision was made to rebuild Shin-ohashi Bridge, but when the time came for the bridge name plate to be removed, members of the local community—centered around PTA members from Onagawa elementary school—relocated the name plate to the school at their own expense.

See details

8. Bashoan Memorial Garden (bashoanshisekitemboteien)

Bashoan Memorial Garden

There is Bashoan Memorial Garden which is annex of Basho Museum along the promenade of the Sumida River. Fine-view garden is next to the Sumida River and Onagigawa River and can enjoy scenery of seasonal waterside. In the garden are a statue of Basho as an old man that begins to rotate at 5 p.m. each day, along with a bas relief of Basho’s hermitage, which enable visitors to recollect ancient times. Also, the garden is lit up until 10 p.m., and visible from the promenade along the Sumidagawa River. ※Because the garden is only open between 9:15 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., it is not possible to see the statue rotating at close quarters.

See details

9. Basho-Inari Shrine (bashoinarijinja)

Basho-Inari Shrine

Basho-Inari Shrine was enshrined in (1917) by hand of local people in 1917, and, in the precincts, there is stone tablet of monument and Basho of Basho hermitage trace. It is thought that Basho once lived in a hermitage near here, making this a historic spot in Tokyo. The land on which the hermitage stood was owned by Sugiyama Sanpuu, one of Basho’s followers, and Basho embarked on travels around Japan from when he moved there in 1680 (the 8th year of the Enpo era) until his death at the age of 51 in October 1694 (the 7th year of the Genroku era).

See details

10. Basho Museum (bashokinenkan)

Basho Museum

This memorial museum is on the banks of the Sumida River, overlooked by the Shin-ohashi and Kiyosubashi Bridges, and on the site on which the famous haiku poet Matsuo Basho built a hermitage for himself. While based in the hermitage, Basho wrote many famous poems and travel journals, including his chronicle ‘Oku no Hosomichi’ (‘The Narrow Road to the Deep North’). Also, in May 2002 (the 14th year of the Heisei era), the Basho Museum was certified as a location on the ‘21 Seiki Basho no Michi’ (‘21st Century Basho Road’) by the Japan Travel Pen Club, and is unique in being the only such location within the Tokyo Metropolitan Area. Monument of "old Shin-ohashi Bridge trace" is built on the sidewalk close to memorial hall. Shin-ohashi Bridge was first constructed in 1693 (the 6th year of the Genroku era). Right at the same time, while Basho was living in his Fukagawa Hermitage and the Shin-ohashi Bridge was under construction, he composed the haiku, ‘Hatsu yuki ya/kake kakari taru/hashi no ue’ (‘First snow/falling/on the half-finished bridge’). Upon witnessing the bridge’s completion, he composed the haiku ‘Arigataya/itadaite fumu/hashi no shimo’ (‘So thankful/in gratitude they tread across/the frosty bridge’).

See details

11. Mannenbashi Bridge (mannembashi)

Mannenbashi Bridge

Mannenbashi Bridge spans the Onagigawa River where it flows into the Sumidagawa River, and in the Edo era was renowned as a location for gaining clear views of Mt. Fuji. It has been depicted in various artworks, including Hokusai’s ‘Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji’ and Hiroshige’s ‘One Hundred Famous Views of Edo’. The present bridge was completed in 1930 (the 5th year of the Showa era). Illuminations on the bridge started in 2009 (the 21st year of the Heisei era), and since then it has decorated nights on the Fukagawa River as a new landmark.

See details

12. Takabashi-Norakurodo(Takabashi Shopping Street) (takabashinorakurodo (takabashishotengai))

Takabashi-Norakurodo(Takabashi Shopping Street)

Visitors to this shopping district can encounter ‘Norakuro’, a work by the manga artist Tagawa Suiho, who lived in Koto City from early childhood to adolescence. We hold vehicle-free promenade on Sundays and holidays and, also, are full of many people at the time of event holding. On their way to the Tagawa Suiho Norakuro-kan, which is inside the Morishita Culture Center, visitors can enjoy dining and shopping while surrounded by the distinctive figure of Norakuro, who is featured on everything from posters to street furniture and shop fronts.

See details

13. The site of Mifunagura (ofunaguraato)

The site of Mifunagura

"Boathouse" means hangar of the Shogunate vessels. The Atakemaru was a pleasure boat owned by third-generation shogun Tokugawa Iemitsu and modeled on a battleship. At the time it was known as ‘the number one ship in Japan’, and was stored here until being dismantled in 1682 (the 2nd year of the Tenna era).

See details

14. Morishita Shopping Street (morishitashotengai)

Morishita Shopping Street

Long-established stores with histories dating back more than a century stand side-by-side in this shopping district. With their downtown charm and renowned original dishes, the restaurants here count both foodies and celebrities among their regular visitors. Also, from the end of June until the beginning of July each year, many people visit the area for the Morning Glory Market. At the intersection in the shopping district are replicas of matoi, decorative standards carried by firefighters in the Edo era, and this is the ideal start and finish point for a walk along the Fukagawa River.

See details

15. Shin-ohashi Bridge (shinohashi)

Shin-ohashi Bridge

The name of Shin-ohashi Bridge comes from that it is bridge built over (1693) newly downstream in 1693 of Ryogokubashi called "Ohashi". The present bridge was completed in 1977 (the 52nd year of the Showa era), and its attractive, imposing form makes good use of its straight lines. Along with Kiyosubashi Bridge, it has been selected as one of the Hundred Views of Modern Tokyo. This bridge is illuminated at night in a vibrant orange color that uplifts the spirits of anyone walking across or viewing it, and is also famous as a location for popular TV dramas.

See details

16. Bashoan Memorial Garden (bashoanshisekitemboteien)

Bashoan Memorial Garden

There is Bashoan Memorial Garden which is annex of Basho Museum along the promenade of the Sumida River. Fine-view garden is next to the Sumida River and Onagigawa River and can enjoy scenery of seasonal waterside. In the garden are a statue of Basho as an old man and a bas relief of his hermitage, enabling visitors to recollect ancient times. Also, the garden is lit up until 10 p.m., and visible from the promenade along the Sumida River. ※The historic spot prospects garden opening time: 9:15-16:30

See details

17. Mannenbashi Bridge (mannembashi)

Mannenbashi Bridge

Mannenbashi Bridge spans the Onagigawa River where it flows into the Sumidagawa River, and in the Edo era was renowned as a location for gaining clear views of Mt. Fuji. It has been depicted in various artworks, including Hokusai’s ‘Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji’ and Hiroshige’s ‘One Hundred Famous Views of Edo’. The present bridge was completed in 1930 (the 5th year of the Showa era). Illuminations on the bridge started in 2009 (the 21st year of the Heisei era), and since then it has decorated nights on the Fukagawa River as a new landmark.

See details